I believe

I believe

(via onepalebluedot)

Morning kisses from the birthday girl #hailsagan #firstbirthday

Morning kisses from the birthday girl #hailsagan #firstbirthday

fylatinamericanhistory:

Distribution of Spanish-speakers in the continental United States, as of 2011. From the United States Census Bureau.
Full report: New Census Bureau Interactive Map Shows Languages Spoken in America.
You can play around with the interactive map here.

fylatinamericanhistory:

Distribution of Spanish-speakers in the continental United States, as of 2011. From the United States Census Bureau.

Full report: New Census Bureau Interactive Map Shows Languages Spoken in America.

You can play around with the interactive map here.

Couldn’t help but reblog this.

 Almost reminds me of witnessing my great grandfather Monsito kill a chicken. All though, if he had been wearing this stylish getup it’d be covered in blood!

Couldn’t help but reblog this.

Almost reminds me of witnessing my great grandfather Monsito kill a chicken. All though, if he had been wearing this stylish getup it’d be covered in blood!

(via seaweedandgravel)

New projects #honda #cl350 #kawasaki #kz200

New projects #honda #cl350 #kawasaki #kz200

Just need to update the tag and it’s road ready! #cb550 #honda #builtnotbought #garagebuilt

Just need to update the tag and it’s road ready! #cb550 #honda #builtnotbought #garagebuilt

More work done and more still to do #cb550 #diy #bratstyle

More work done and more still to do #cb550 #diy #bratstyle

Spring is here #honda #cb550 #kz400 #cb750

Spring is here #honda #cb550 #kz400 #cb750

firstbook:

If you work with kids from low-income neighborhoods, First Book can help you get brand-new, high-quality books.

firstbook:

If you work with kids from low-income neighborhoods, First Book can help you get brand-new, high-quality books.

(via guernicamag)

witchlingfumbles:

syristones:

blackspider:

yugendreams:

This is happening now. This image has to reach the rest of the world. The Kayapo being expelled from their homes for the construction of the Belo Monte Dam, which will flood 400.000 acres of the Amazon Rainforest in Brazil.

This is one of the most horrifying things I’ve seen recently. Fuck I hate humanity.

This hurts my heart to see. 

Spread this shit like wildfire.

witchlingfumbles:

syristones:

blackspider:

yugendreams:

This is happening now. This image has to reach the rest of the world. The Kayapo being expelled from their homes for the construction of the Belo Monte Dam, which will flood 400.000 acres of the Amazon Rainforest in Brazil.

This is one of the most horrifying things I’ve seen recently. Fuck I hate humanity.

This hurts my heart to see. 

Spread this shit like wildfire.

(via bestfriendsforevil)

The Beautiful Resistance

An informative and inspiring video on the reenergized Chican@ political art movement. 

Big respect for my friend Jesus Barraza and his partner Melanie Cervantes of Dignidad Rebelde for sharing their story and adding to the imagery of la lucha!

thinkmexican:

The Maya Are Alive – and Have Made Some Wise Recent Predictions
The Zapatistas foresaw the long-term dangers of globalization. So much for the idea that the Maya are a ‘thing of the past’
When the Maya indigenous peoples of southeast Mexico launched a revolution in 1994, they most certainly did not have in mind the “end of the world.” If there was, in the Zapatista imagination, a date evoking a doomsday, it would have to be January 1, 1994, the date of the inauguration of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).
To the Zapatistas, the enactment of economic globalization was nothing short of a “death sentence,” because they understood it could have lethal implications for the land and ancient traditions of the Mayas. On that cool winter’s day, armed with sticks, stones and very little ammunition, the Maya rebels of the Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (EZLN) heralded a new era. But new did not mean better: the uprising did not result in the Mexican constitution fully recognizing the indigenous peoples as subjects with juridical status.
Indeed, the long-term repercussions of both economic globalization and the Maya uprising itself, were clearly foreseen by the Zapatistas, who predicted, not an end of the world, but the collapse of the western capitalist economy. Furthermore, Zapatista predictions had a certain sense of “prophecy” – with all the connotations that word has: in the sense of teaching and the sense of foretelling or anticipating. When the EZLN had stated in the first Lacandona declaration that the era of party politics was over, it was not only prophesying alternative ways of making politics – invoking direct democracy (based, incidentally, on ancient Maya traditions, and different from representative democracy), but it was, in fact, anticipating the collapse of some political institutions of western modernity.
In 1999 and 2007 the Mayan rebels’ spokesperson, Subcomandante Marcos, anticipated the collapse of the financial and banking systems. Indeed, the EZLN was predicting nothing less than the demise of Lehman Brothers: “companies and states will crumble in a matter of minutes, not by the storms of proletariat revolutions, but by the onslaught of financial hurricanes.” Were these words not glaringly prophetic?
If anything, the Zapatista Mayan prophecy would have been the announcement of the end of a myth: a realization echoed by the Occupy movement years later. And if myths were crumbling, Nafta marked the beginning of a new series of crises; the Zapatistas were the first truly to understand this, along with the shattering of the promises of modernity.
To the Mexican government, NAFTA had represented legitimate access to the future, a right of entry to the elite club of the emerging powerful corporate world; but, to the Zapatistas, NAFTA came to signify the beginning of a yet another long-fought historical war against colonial and neocolonial voracity. To some, the Maya represent a source of apocalyptic delusion and “a thing of the past” for tourist consumption only. But, asserting that Maya today are extinct, as many do, not only denotes grotesque ignorance and bigotry, but it is a rhetorical manoeuvre to validate their exploitation, conveniently transforming them into cheap labour to cater for their billionaire tourist industry.
Read More at The Guardian
Image Credit: Radio Pozol

thinkmexican:

The Maya Are Alive – and Have Made Some Wise Recent Predictions

The Zapatistas foresaw the long-term dangers of globalization. So much for the idea that the Maya are a ‘thing of the past’

When the Maya indigenous peoples of southeast Mexico launched a revolution in 1994, they most certainly did not have in mind the “end of the world.” If there was, in the Zapatista imagination, a date evoking a doomsday, it would have to be January 1, 1994, the date of the inauguration of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

To the Zapatistas, the enactment of economic globalization was nothing short of a “death sentence,” because they understood it could have lethal implications for the land and ancient traditions of the Mayas. On that cool winter’s day, armed with sticks, stones and very little ammunition, the Maya rebels of the Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (EZLN) heralded a new era. But new did not mean better: the uprising did not result in the Mexican constitution fully recognizing the indigenous peoples as subjects with juridical status.

Indeed, the long-term repercussions of both economic globalization and the Maya uprising itself, were clearly foreseen by the Zapatistas, who predicted, not an end of the world, but the collapse of the western capitalist economy. Furthermore, Zapatista predictions had a certain sense of “prophecy” – with all the connotations that word has: in the sense of teaching and the sense of foretelling or anticipating. When the EZLN had stated in the first Lacandona declaration that the era of party politics was over, it was not only prophesying alternative ways of making politics – invoking direct democracy (based, incidentally, on ancient Maya traditions, and different from representative democracy), but it was, in fact, anticipating the collapse of some political institutions of western modernity.

In 1999 and 2007 the Mayan rebels’ spokesperson, Subcomandante Marcos, anticipated the collapse of the financial and banking systems. Indeed, the EZLN was predicting nothing less than the demise of Lehman Brothers: “companies and states will crumble in a matter of minutes, not by the storms of proletariat revolutions, but by the onslaught of financial hurricanes.” Were these words not glaringly prophetic?

If anything, the Zapatista Mayan prophecy would have been the announcement of the end of a myth: a realization echoed by the Occupy movement years later. And if myths were crumbling, Nafta marked the beginning of a new series of crises; the Zapatistas were the first truly to understand this, along with the shattering of the promises of modernity.

To the Mexican government, NAFTA had represented legitimate access to the future, a right of entry to the elite club of the emerging powerful corporate world; but, to the Zapatistas, NAFTA came to signify the beginning of a yet another long-fought historical war against colonial and neocolonial voracity. To some, the Maya represent a source of apocalyptic delusion and “a thing of the past” for tourist consumption only. But, asserting that Maya today are extinct, as many do, not only denotes grotesque ignorance and bigotry, but it is a rhetorical manoeuvre to validate their exploitation, conveniently transforming them into cheap labour to cater for their billionaire tourist industry.

Read More at The Guardian

Image Credit: Radio Pozol

I'm Sam. I'm from the great state of Oklahoma, USA.

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